Important British English Idioms


Across the pond This idiom means on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, used to refer to the US or the UK depending on the speaker’s location.

All mouth and trousers Someone who’s all mouth and trousers talks or boasts a lot but doesn’t deliver. ‘All mouth and no trousers’ is also used, though this is a corruption of the original.

All my eye and Peggy Martin An idiom that appears to have gone out of use but was prevalent in the English north Midlands of Staffordshire, Cheshire and Derbyshire from at least the turn of the 20th century until the early 1950s or so. The idiom’s meaning is literally something said or written that is unbelievable, rumor, over embellished, the result of malicious village gossip etc.

All talk and no trousers Someone who is all talk and no trousers, talks about doing big, important things, but doesn’t take any action.

An Englishman’s home is his castle This means that what happens in a person’s home or  private life is their business and should not be subject to outside interference.

Argue the toss If you argue the toss, you refuse to accept a decision and argue about it.

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