HAND IN x HAND OUT x HANDOUT: qual é a diferença?


HAND IN

to submit, esp. a piece of work, to a teacher, boss etc. [entregar um trabalho etc.]

  • The director of the company asked his employees to hand in their assessments of his performance by 5:00 p.m.
  • O diretor da empresa pediu a seus funcionários queentregassem as avaliações sobre o desempenho dele até as 17h.

Cf. Falsas gêmeas: TEACHER x PROFESSOR
Cf. Qual é a diferença entre “CHIEF”, “BOSS” e “CHEF”?
Cf. PERFORMANCE: 17 sugestões de tradução (e nenhuma é performance!)

» Veja também turn in (primeira acepção).

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Embarrassed or Ashamed?


Hello again!

Today we’re going to talk about the difference between these two words:embarrassed and ashamed.

 Ambos “embarrassed” e “ashamed” significam “envergonhado“, “com vergonha“, e a diferença é bem simples, apesar de sutil:

 Quando estamos “embarrassed” é porque estamos desconfortáveis em alguma situação, como falar em público, por exemplo. Tanto que “embarrassed” lembra a palavra em português “embaraçado”, que quer dizer exatamente o mesmo: sentir-seincômodo, constrangido, envergonhado ou acanhado. Veja as seguintes frases:

  •  She got really embarrassed when she tripped in front of Jack. (Ela ficou super envergonhada quando ela tropeçou na frente do Jack.)
  •  At first, he used to feel embarrassed, but now he’s able to perform in front of huge crowds. (No começo, ele costumava ficar com vergonha, mas agora ele é capaz de se apresentar na frente de enormes multidões.)
  •  She’s always been very shy, she feels very embarrassed about talking to people she doesn’t know. (Ela sempre foi muito tímida, ela se sente muito envergonhada em falar com pessoas que ela não conhece.)

Agora, quando estamos “ashamed” nós nos sentimos culpados, nós temos vergonha de alguma coisa errada que fizemos. Veja:

  •  Meg felt ashamed of the way she talked to her mother. (A Meg se sentiu envergonhada pelo jeito como ela falou com sua mãe.)
  •  You should be ashamed of yourself! Your behavior was unacceptable!(Você deveria ter vergonha de si mesmo! Seu comportamento foi inaceitável!)
  •  Charlie was ashamed for having lied to his best friend. (O Charlie estava muito envergonhado por ter mentido para o seu melhor amigo.)

 Perceberam a diferença?

Só mais um detalhe:

  1. Com EMBARRASSED usamos a preposição ABOUT. (embarrassed abouttalking in public)
  2. Com ASHAMED usamos a preposição OF. (ashamed of his behavior)

Well, that’s it for now folks!

Business English Collocations


Business English collocations are commonly used combinations of words used when speaking about business in English. Collocations can be understood as words that usually go together. For example, in English we do business not make business. The business English collocation “do business” is a collocation that can make all the difference if you are trying to do business around the world. When decisions concern a lot of money, you can imagine it’s important to get the phrase right!

Here are common business English collocations with verbs used in various business situations:

We use do and make with common business operations:

Do

do the accounts Mary does the accounts in bookkeeping.
business We do business with countries around the world.
a deal  We did a deal with them last year.
due diligence Let’s do due diligence before we begin the project.
paperwork First we have to do the paperwork.
research Let’s do some research on the subject.

Make

an appointment I made an appointment for a meeting next week.

read more…

Common Collocations


On this page you can find a few short lists of common collocations to give you more of an idea about them. Many good learner’s dictionaries show collocations associated with specific words. There are also dictionaries of collocations, though these are more difficult to find.

Verb collocations

have do make
have a bath
have a drink
have a good time
have a haircut
have a holiday
have a problem
have a relationship
have a rest
have lunch
have sympathy
do business
do nothing
do someone a favour
do the cooking
do the housework
do the shopping
do the washing up
do your best
do your hair
do your homework
make a difference
make a mess
make a mistake
make a noise
make an effort
make furniture
make money
make progress
make room
make trouble
take break catch
take a break
take a chance
take a look
take a rest
take a seat
take a taxi
take an exam
take notes
take someone’s place
take someone’s temperature
break a habit
break a leg
break a promise
break a record
break a window
break someone’s heart
break the ice
break the law
break the news to someone
break the rules
catch a ball
catch a bus
catch a chill
catch a cold
catch a thief
catch fire
catch sight of
catch someone’s attention
catch someone’s eye
catch the flu
pay save keep
pay a fine
pay attention
pay by credit card
pay cash
pay interest
pay someone a compliment
pay someone a visit
pay the bill
pay the price
pay your respects
save electricity
save energy
save money
save one’s strength
save someone a seat
save someone’s life
save something to a disk
save space
save time
save yourself the trouble
keep a diary
keep a promise
keep a secret
keep an appointment
keep calm
keep control
keep in touch
keep quiet
keep someone’s place
keep the change
come go get
come close
come complete with
come direct
come early
come first
come into view
come last
come late
come on time
come prepared
come right back
come second
come to a compromise
come to a decision
come to an agreement
come to an end
come to a standstill
come to terms with
come to a total of
come under attack
go abroad
go astray
go bad
go bald
go bankrupt
go blind
go crazy
go dark
go deaf
go fishing
go mad
go missing
go on foot
go online
go out of business
go overseas
go quiet
go sailing
go to war
go yellow
get a job
get a shock
get angry
get divorced
get drunk
get frightened
get home
get lost
get married
get nowhere
get permission
get pregnant
get ready
get started
get the impression
get the message
get the sack
get upset
get wet
get worried

Miscellaneous collocations

Time Business English Classifiers
bang on time
dead on time
early 12th century
free time
from dawn till dusk
great deal of time
late 20th century
make time for
next few days
past few weeks
right on time
run out of time
save time
spare time
spend some time
take your time
tell someone the time
time goes by
time passes
waste time
annual turnover
bear in mind
break off negotiations
cease trading
chair a meeting
close a deal
close a meeting
come to the point
dismiss an offer
draw a conclusion
draw your attention to
launch a new product
lay off staff
go bankrupt
go into partnership
make a loss
make a profit
market forces
sales figures
take on staff
a ball of string

a bar of chocolate

a bottle of water

a bunch of carrots

a cube of sugar

a pack of cards

a pad of paper

read more…

Past simple


With most verbs the past tense is formed by adding -ed:

call >> called; like >> liked; want >> wanted; work >> workedP

But there are a lot of irregular past tenses in English. Here are the most common irregular verbs in English, with their past tenses:

infinitive irregular past
be
begin
break
bring
buy
build
choose
come
cost
cut
do
draw
drive
eat
feel
find
get
give
go
have
hear
hold
keep
know
leave
lead
let
lie
lose
make
mean
meet
pay
put
run
say
sell
send
set
sit
speak
spend
stand
take
teach
tell
think
understand
wear
win
write
was/were
began
broke
brought
bought
built
chose
came
cost
cut
did
drew
drove
ate
felt
found
got
gave
went
had
heard
held
kept
knew
left
led
let
lay
lost
made
meant
met
paid
put
ran
said
sold
sent
set
sat
spoke
spent
stood
took
taught
told
thought
understood
wore
won
wrote

Use

We use the past tense to talk about:

  • something that happened once in the past:

I met my wife in 1983.
We went to Spain for our holidays.
They got home very late last night.

  • something that happened again and again in the past:

When I was a boy I walked a mile to school every day.
We swam a lot while we were on holiday.
They always enjoyed visiting their friends.

  • something that was true for some time in the past:

I lived abroad for ten years.
He enjoyed being a student.
She played a lot of tennis when she was younger.

  • we often use phrases with ago with the past tense:

I met my wife a long time ago.

T.G.I.F – Learn English – Drinking Vocabulary


How can you talk about how drunk you were last night? …Or are going to be tonight? This lesson we show you the levels of being drunk, and the wonderful things it does to your body!

Of course there are more ways to say “drunk”, but we couldn’t fit them all in this video! So here they are:

Effed, Pissed, Legless, F**ked, Tipsy,Wrecked, Schlitzed, Merry, Three sheets to the wind, Blind, Pickled, Leathered, Buzzed, Off the wagon, Trashed, On a bender, Looped/loopy, Gunned, Pixilated, Ripped, Sloshed, Gone, Done, Hammered, Wasted, Sauced, Liquored up, Boozy, Happy, Wrecked, Stiff, Intoxicated, Under the Influence, Plastered, Inebriated, Loaded, Tanked, Decimated, Dot Cottoned
Battered, Befuggered, Bernard Langered, Bladdered, Blasted, Blathered, Bleezin, Blitzed, Blootered, Blottoed, Bluttered, Boogaloo, Brahms & Liszt, Buckled, Burlin, Cabbaged, Chevy Chased, Clobbered
Decimated, Dot Cottoned, Druck-steaming, Drunk as a Lord, Drunk as a skunk, Etched, Fecked, Fleemered (Germany), Four to the floor, Gatted, Goosed, Got my beer goggles on, Guttered (Inverness), Had a couple of shickers, Hammer-blowed, Hammered, Hanging, Having the whirlygigs, Howling, Inebriated, Intoxicated, Jahalered, Jaiked up (West of Scotland), Jan’d – abbrev for Jan Hammered, Jaxied, Jeremied, Jolly, Kaned, Lagged up, Lamped, Langered (Ireland) [also langers, langerated], Laroped, or alt. larrupt, Lashed, Leathered, Legless, Liquored up (South Carolina), Locked, Locked out of your mind (Ireland), Loo la, Mad wey it, Mandoo-ed, Mangled, Manky, Mashed, Meff’d, Merl Haggard, Merry, Minced, Ming-ho, Minging, Moired, Monged, Monkey-full, Mottled, Mullered, Newcastled, Nicely irrigated with horizontal lubricant, Off me pickle, Off me trolley, On a campaign, Out of it, Out yer tree, Paggered, Palintoshed, Paraletic, Peelywally, Peevied, Pickled, Pie-eyed, Pished, Plastered, Poleaxed, Pollatic, Rat-legged (Stockport), Ratted, Ravaged, Razzled, Reek-ho, Rendered, Rosy glow, Rubbered, Ruined, Saying hello to Mr Armitage, Scattered, Schindlers, Screwed, Scuttered (Dublin), Shedded [as in ” My shed has collapsed taking most of the fence with it”], Slaughtered, Sloshed, Smashed, Snatered (Ireland), Snobbled (Wales), Sozzled, Spangled, Spannered, Spiffed, Spongelled, Squiffy, Steamin, Steampigged, Stocious, Stonkin, Tanked, Tashered, Tipsy, Trashed, Trollied, Troubled, Trousered, Twisted, Warped, Wasted, Wellied, With the fairies, Wrecked, Zombied